First Annual Charles Braswell Music Therapy Symposium

Music Therapy In Healthcare: Clinical Practices & Supervision
September 22–23, 2017

 


Charles Edward Braswell (above) founded Loyola's Music Therapy Degree Program, one of the first of its kind in the South. This symposium celebrates his legacy: sixty years of Loyola Music Therapy.
 

All events are free, but space is limited. Register in advance to secure your spot.

 

Questions? Contact Dr. Kathleen Murphy at (504) 865-2122 or kmmurphy@loyno.edu.


Register Today
 



SCHEDULE  |  BIOGRAPHIES  |  DIRECTIONS
 

SCHEDULE

Friday, September 22, 2017

 

Registration

12–12:30pm | Nunemaker Lobby

 


Opening Remarks & Welcome

Kern Maass and Kathleen M. Murphy
12:30–1pm | Nunemaker Auditorium

 


Tribute to Charles E. Braswell & Loyola Music Therapy Program

Anthony Decuir and Darlene Brooks
1–1:45 pm | Nunemaker Auditorium

 


Break

1:45–2pm

 


Three Sessions

 

1. Living while Dying: Music Therapy at the End of Life


Cheryl Dileo
2–4:45pm | Nunemaker Auditorium


Through lecture and experiential learning, this course will provide an overview of the uses of music therapy in hospice care according to the clinical needs of those served.

 

 

2. Multicultural Issues in Music Therapy Supervision


Natasha Thomas
2–4:45pm | Music Building, Room 203


This course assists helping professionals become more aware of issues related to cultural background and competency, class, socioeconomic status, and gender as they relate to relationships with clients, colleagues, and supervision in our increasingly diverse profession. Throughout the course material, the instructor provides a framework as to why conversations about multiculturalism are important and gives you tools and steps that you can take to assist you in becoming a more cognizant, compassionate supervisor.

 

3. Music Therapy in Traumatic Brain Injury


Victoria Vega
2–4:45pm | Music Building, Room 204G


This session will focus on the use of music therapy when working with survivors of traumatic brain injury. A brief overview of types of brain injuries and their physical effects will be presented. This will be followed by a discussion of music therapy methods used when treating survivors.

 

Reception

5–6:30pm | Nunemaker Lobby

 

 

 

September 23, 2017

 

Registration

8:30–9am | Music Building, Second Floor

 


Two Sessions

 

1. Supervision for Supervisors: An Experiential Course


Darlene Brooks
9–11:45am | Music Building, Room 204G


This session is designed for music therapy professions. Through experiential exercises attendees will explore reactions and responses they have when working with other professionals, especially those they supervise. Games that supervisees play will be reviewed.

 

 

2. Music Therapy in Cancer Care: Stages of Survivorship


Joy Allen
19–11:45am | Music Building, Room 230


The concept of cancer survivorship includes everything in life that changes as a result of the diagnosis of cancer and its aftermath. Through didactic and experiential learning, this session will explore music therapy methods for addressing the physical, emotional, and spiritual needs throughout the evolving process of living with, through, or beyond cancer.

 


Lunch on Your Own

11:45am–1:15pm

 


Ethical Issues in Supervision


Kathleen M. Murphy
1:15–4pm | Music Building, Room 203


This session will review guidelines for ethical supervision. A combination of didactic and experiential learning, participants will examine common issues that may arise in supervision including dual relationships, working and supervising within one’s scope of practice and abilities, and how to prevent harm.

 

 

 

BIOGRAPHIES


Joy Allen, PhD, MT-BC is the Chair of the Music Therapy Program at Berklee College of Music. She has extensive experience working in medical settings, focusing on psychological health, pain management, and the family system. Allen has written articles and book chapters and is the editor of Guidelines for Music Therapy Practice: Adult Medical Care. She is an alumna of the Music Therapy Program and served as Music Therapy Program Coordinator from 2013 until 2016.

 

 


Darlene Brooks, PhD, MT-BC is the Director of the Music Therapy Program and Coordinator of the master’s degree program at Temple University. She has over 25 years of clinical and supervisory experience. She is an alumna of the Music Therapy Program and served as the Music Therapy Program coordinator from 1993 until 2000.

 

 


Anthony Decuir, PhD, received the Lifetime Achievement Award for Outstanding Professional Contributions from the American Music Therapy Association. Decuir taught in the music therapy program at Loyola since 1974. The award recognizes his work as a music therapy clinician in mental health. As an active vocalist, clinician, teacher, researcher and advocate, Decuir's extensive music therapy career spans four decades. He served as president of the National Association for Music Therapy from 1986 to 1988, providing vital leadership at a time of transition and financial challenges. During his term, the organization’s board was able to preserve its financial integrity, and the association established an independent office just blocks from Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. Since then, Decuir has served both the National Association for Music Therapy and the American Music Therapy Association.

 

 


Cheryl Dileo, PhD, MT-BC is the Laura H. Carnell Professor of Music Therapy, Coordinator of the PhD Program and Director of the Arts and Quality of Life Research Center at Temple University. She is the Past President of the National Association for Music Therapy (USA) and World Federation of Music Therapy. She is the author/editor of 15 books and more than 100 articles and chapters on music therapy. She is an alumna of the Music Therapy Program at Loyola University.

 

 


Kern Maass is Dean of the College of Music and Fine Arts at Loyola University New Orleans. He brings over 15 years of leadership experience to Loyola. In his former role as the Associate Dean for the College of Fine & Applied Arts at Appalachian State University, Maass oversaw over 3,000 students and 200 faculty as they related to curricular, advising, and resource needs. Other leadership roles have dealt with program development, curriculum, policy, assessment, intellectual property, industry partnerships, and accreditation, which have given him a unique perspective on how to position and leverage creative practice in multiple contexts. Most recently Maass has developed and led two such projects, AppLab and Howard Street. These projects were created to break down silos, enable interdisciplinary research opportunities for faculty and students, and engage the community.

 

 


Kathleen M. Murphy, PhD, MT is the Coordinator of Music Therapy at Loyola University. She is a clinician, supervisor, and researcher with over 30 years of clinical experience in healthcare and educational institutions. She has authored book chapters and journal articles and is the associate editor of Music Therapy Research (3rd Edition). Her research interests are focused on music therapy in substance dependence treatment across the life span and post-traumatic stress disorder. 

 

 


Natasha Thomas, MS, MT-BC is a Board Certified Music Therapist and the Clinical Coordinator of Music Therapy at Loyola University New Orleans. She received her undergraduate degree in music therapy from the University of North Dakota (UND), holds a masters degree in special education (also from UND, with an emphasis on visual impairment), and is a PhD candidate in expressive therapies at Lesley University in Cambridge, MA.

 



Victoria Policastro Vega, PhD, MT-BC is a music therapy clinician, educator, and lecturer. She has worked at hospitals and rehabilitation centers in the New Orleans area. Dr. Vega’s research interests are music therapy with neurologic disorders, professional burnout, and personality. She is an alumna of the Music Therapy Program and served as the Music Therapy Program Coordinator from 2000 to 2013. Currently, Dr. Vega is the Associate Dean for the College of Music and Fine Arts.

 

 

 

DIRECTIONS

 

From I-10 West Traveling East
 

Follow the signs toward the Central Business District. As you enter the downtown area, follow the signs that merge to Highway 90 Westbank/Superdome/Claiborne Avenue After merging onto Highway 90, get in the righthand lane and exit at St. Charles Avenue/Carondelet Street (do not cross the bridge). At the second traffic light, turn right onto St. Charles Avenue. Follow St. Charles Avenue for four miles. Loyola's main campus is on the right at 6363 St. Charles Avenue.

 

From I-10 East Traveling West
 

As you enter the downtown area, follow the signs to Highway 90 Business/West Bank. Exit at St. Charles Avenue/Carondelet Street (do not cross bridge). At the second traffic light, turn right onto St. Charles Avenue. Follow St. Charles Avenue for four miles. Loyola's main campus is on the right at 6363 St. Charles Avenue.